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Monsanto's Dark History | 10 Facts You Should Know About Monsanto

Seeds of Sustainability DVDs - Growing Sprouts With No Daily Rinsing

Table of Contents

  1. Aspartame Videos
  2. What is Aspartame?
  3. How is Aspartame Made?
  4. Documentary Movies
  5. Aspartame News Articles
  6. Products Containing Aspartame
  7. Saccharine
  8. History of Saccharin
  9. USDA Regulation & Deregulation
  10. Saccharine Warning Labels
  11. Cyclamate in Canada
  12. Splenda = Sucralose
  13. Aspartame History

Related Resources

WARNING: NEVER DRINK ASPARTAME !
NUTRASWEET, EQUAL, CREATINE, nor CANDEREL

Monsanto's Aspartame & Phenylalanine Business
is now Owned by Pfizer (Listerine)

Just like fluoridated water, aspartame is literally a poison in almost ALL of our food. Aspartame causes seizures, brain tumors, multiple sclerosis (MS), and Grave's disease. In 1970, scientists fed milk with aspartame to 7 monkeys to study the effects. The final results: starting after 218 days - 5 monkeys had grand mal seizures and 1 died. IT'S IN ALMOST ALL OF OUR FOOD! Ever heard of Equal, NutraSweet, Creatine, or Canderel?

The deadly artificial sweetener nutrasweet is produced by feeding fossil fuel OIL to ecoli that are genetically modified to DEFECATE aspartame as feces. Not so sweet after you realize what you're actually eating!

99% of North American wild bees died in the 1990s!

Saccharin was delisted by the Office of Environmental Health Hazard Assessment (OEHHA) of the California Environmental Protection Agency from the list of chemicals known to the state to cause cancer on April 6, 2001. It had been added to the list of CARCINOGENS in 1989.

Food Crop Fertilizers, Pesticides & Herbicides
are ALL made from hydrocarbon fossil fuels,
but could be made from organic carbohydrates!

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NutraSweet CANDEREL
diet Coke Diet Pepsi

Monsanto's Aspartame & Phenylalanine Business
is now Owned by Pfizer (Listerine)

WARNING: NEVER DRINK ASPARTAME !
NUTRASWEET, EQUAL, CREATINE, nor CANDEREL

Aspertame Diet Soda Pop

Just like fluoridated water, aspartame is literally a poison in almost ALL of our food. Aspartame causes seizures, brain tumors, multiple sclerosis (MS), and Grave's disease. In 1970, scientists fed milk with aspartame to 7 monkeys to study the effects. The final results: starting after 218 days - 5 monkeys had grand mal seizures and 1 died. IT'S IN ALMOST ALL OF OUR FOOD! Ever heard of Equal, NutraSweet, Creatine, or Canderel?

The deadly artificial sweetener nutrasweet is produced by feeding fossil fuel OIL to ecoli that are genetically modified to DEFECATE aspartame as feces. Not so sweet after you realize what you're actually eating!

Aspartame is a commercially produced artificial sweetner (sugar substitute) made from:

  • 50% phenylalanine (an essential amino acid)
  • 40% aspartic acid (a nonessential amino acid)
  • 10% methyl alcohol (wood alcohol, becomes formaldehyde at 85°F).

Please note that even G.D. Searle (the original manufacturer of aspartame) admitted that aspartame could not be used for everything. Even the FDA mentioned you could not use it to bake because it breaks down. Yet they approved it in dry products to begin with and when you put Equal in such things as hot coffee you just heated it. Then in 1993 they approved it for baking against their own instructions. In 1996 Dr. David Kessler granted blanket approval for it to be used in everything. How did they do it? Dr. Kessler said if the complaints went down they could do it. So the FDA stopped taking complaints and many people called and asked why they would not take the complaint.

Sweet Misery A Poisoned World The World According to Monsanto Equal = NutraSweet

"It amazes me that people don't want to hear it. I have a neuromuscular dx and had a predisposition to it's harm. I was working raising my kids busy like everyone. When i got the information I quit [aspartame]. I actually have helped a few, and I am sure [BestMeal.info] has helped many. Information is power, not money. And they are trying to keep the truth from us. Some just don't want to know and they amaze me but I keep on going. People they say, 'oh I am not like her', fail to realize we are all the same."
— BestMeal.info Subscriber Testimonial

Aspartame News Articles

Chronic Methanol/Formaldehyde
Poisoning From Aspartame

Aspartame (Nutrasweet) Toxicity Info Center

DIET COKE KILLED MY WIFE - RON DODGE

THE CHARLES FLEMING MURDER CASE
How Did Diane Fleming Get Wrongly
Convicted Of Murdering Her Husband?

FDA Pivotal Safety Study: Aspartame Caused Brain Seizures

The Deadly Deception of Aspartame by the FDA and Searle

New Study of Splenda Reveals Shocking Information

Study Finds Mercury in High Fructose Corn Syrup

BPA Found in Soda Cans

List of Products Containing Aspartame

  • Breath Mints
  • Carbonated Soft Drinks
  • Cereals
  • Chewing Gum
  • Flavored Syrups for Coffee
  • Flavored Water Products
  • Frozen Ice
  • Frozen Ice Cream Novelties
  • Fruit Spreads
  • Gelatin, Sugar Free
  • Hard Candies
  • Ice cream Toppings
  • Ice Creams, No Sugar Added or Sugar Free
  • Iced Tea, Powder
  • Iced Tea, Ready to Drink
  • Instant Cocoa Mix
  • Jams & Jellies
  • Juice Blends
  • Juice Drinks
  • Maple Syrups
  • Meal Replacements
  • Mousse
  • No Sugar Added Pies
  • Non-Carbonated Diet Soft drinks
  • Nutritional Bars
  • Powdered Soft Drinks
  • Protein Nutritional Drinks
  • Pudding
  • Soft Candy Chews
  • Sugar Free Chocolate Syrup
  • Sugar Free Cookies
  • Sugar Free Ketchup
  • Table Top Sweeteners
  • Vegetable Drinks
  • Yogurt, Drinkable
  • Yogurt, Fat Free
  • Yogurt, Sugar Free
Caution Contains Aspartame Products with Aspartame
Nutrasweet, Equal, Same Aspartame Sweet and Low, Equal, Splenda
DANGER - These products all contain Aspartame

 

WARNING! Carcinogens Cause Cancer

WARNING! Carcinogens Cause Cancer
SWEET 'N LOW: Saccharin is an artificial sweetener. The basic substance, benzoic sulfilimine, has effectively no food energy and is much sweeter than sucrose, but has an unpleasant bitter or metallic aftertaste, especially at high concentrations. It is used to sweeten products such as drinks, candies, biscuits, medicines, and toothpaste.

Saccharin was delisted by the Office of Environmental Health Hazard Assessment (OEHHA) of the California Environmental Protection Agency from the list of chemicals known to the state to cause cancer on April 6, 2001. It had been added to the list of CARCINOGENS in 1989.

Tab with Saccharin Low-Calorie Sugar Substitute

1902: Monsanto Made Saccharin for Coca-Cola

Saccharin is an artificial sweetener. The basic substance, benzoic sulfilimine, has effectively no food energy and is much sweeter than sucrose, but has an unpleasant bitter or metallic aftertaste, especially at high concentrations. It is used to sweeten products such as drinks, candies, biscuits, medicines, and toothpaste.

History of Saccharin

Sweet 'N Low
Saccharin was first produced in 1878 by Constantin Fahlberg, a chemist working on coal tar derivatives in Ira Remsen's laboratory at the Johns Hopkins University. The sweet taste of saccharin was discovered when Fahlberg noticed a sweet taste on his hand one evening, and connected this with the compound which he had been working on that day. Fahlberg and Remsen published articles on benzoic sulfimide in 1879 and 1880. In 1884, now working on his own in New York City, Fahlberg applied for patents in several countries describing methods of producing this substance that he named saccharin. Fahlberg would soon grow wealthy, while Remsen merely grew irate, believing that he deserved credit for substances produced in his laboratory. On the matter, Remsen commented, "Fahlberg is a scoundrel. It nauseates me to hear my name mentioned in the same breath with him."

Although saccharin was commercialized not long after its discovery, it was not until sugar shortages during World War I that its use became widespread. Its popularity further increased during the 1960s and 1970s among dieters, since saccharin is a calorie-free sweetener. In the United States saccharin is often found in restaurants in pink packets; the most popular brand is "Sweet'N Low".

Saccharin was delisted by the Office of Environmental Health Hazard Assessment (OEHHA) of the California Environmental Protection Agency from the list of chemicals known to the state to cause cancer on April 6, 2001. It had been added to the list in 1989.

Government Regulation & Deregulation

Starting in 1907, the USDA began investigating saccharin as a direct result of the Pure Food and Drug Act. Harvey Wiley, then the director of the bureau of chemistry for the USDA, viewed it as an illegal substitution of a valuable ingredient (sugar) by a less valuable ingredient. In a clash that had career consequences, Wiley told then President Theodore Roosevelt that "Everyone who ate that sweet corn was deceived. He thought he was eating sugar, when in point of fact he was eating a coal tar product totally devoid of food value and extremely injurious to health." But Roosevelt himself was a consumer of saccharin, and in a heated exchange, Roosevelt angrily answered Wiley by stating, "Anybody who says saccharin is injurious to health is an idiot." The episode proved the undoing of Wiley's career.

In 1911, the Food Inspection Decision 135 stated that foods containing saccharin were adulterated. However in 1912, Food Inspection Decision 142 stated that saccharin was not harmful. Go figure?

More controversy was stirred in 1969 with the discovery of files from the FDA's investigations of 1948 and 1949. These investigations, which had originally argued against saccharin use, were shown to prove little about saccharin being harmful to human health. In 1972 the USDA made an attempt to completely ban the substance. However, this attempt was also unsuccessful and the sweetener is widely used in the United States; it is the third-most popular after sucralose and aspartame.

In the European Union saccharin is also known by the E number (additive code) E954.

The current status of saccharin is that it is allowed in most countries, and countries like Canada are considering lifting their previous ban of it as a food additive. The concerns that it is associated with bladder cancer were proved to be without foundation in experiments on primates.

Diet Dr. Pepper Saccharine CAUSES Cancer in laboratory animals

Saccharine Warning Label Removal

Studies in laboratory rats during the early 1970s linked saccharin with the development of bladder cancer in rodents, resulting in the United States Congress mandating that all food containing saccharin bear a warning label.

However, in 2000, the warning labels were removed because scientists learned that rodents, unlike humans, have a unique combination of high pH, high calcium phosphate, and high protein levels in their urine. One or more of the proteins that is more prevalent in male rats combines with calcium phosphate and saccharin to produce microcrystals that damage the lining of the bladder. Over time, the rat's bladder responds to this damage by over-producing cells to repair the damage, and this leads to tumor formation. As this does not occur in humans, there is no elevated bladder cancer risk.

The delisting of saccharin led to legislation, which was signed into law on December 21, 2000, repealing the warning label requirement for products containing saccharin. In 2001 the U.S. Food and Drug Administration and the state of California reversed their positions on saccharin, declaring it safe for consumption. The FDA’s decision followed a 2000 determination by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services' National Toxicology Program to remove saccharin from its list of carcinogens.

The EPA has officially removed saccharin and its salts from their list of hazardous constituents and commercial chemical products. In a December 14, 2010 release, the EPA stated that saccharin is no longer considered a potential hazard to human health.

Cyclamate = Canada's Saccharine

Cyclamate was accidentally discovered in 1937 by a graduate student at the University of Illinois. It is 30 to 50 times sweeter than sugar. The FDA banned cyclamate in 1970 after reports that it caused cancer in animals, but there is currently a petition for re-approval.

Cyclamate is still used in over 50 countries, including Canada (where it is the sweetener in Sweet n' Low). Ironically, saccharin is banned in Canada except for use by diabetics.

Pillsbury's Funny Face Rootin'-Tootin' Raspberry Cyclamate Kool-aid
Cyclamate Racecar at Rock-N-Race Cyclamate Racecar

 

Splenda = sucralose-based artificial sweetener

Dangers of Splenda

Dr. Hull's Book About The Potential Dangers Of Splenda®

Is Splenda Making You Sick? Find Out Some Common Reaction Symptoms

The Secret Dangers of Splenda (Sucralose)

Potential Dangers of Sucralose (Splenda)

Sugar substitutes and the potential danger of Splenda

 

History of Monsanto's Saccharin & Aspartame

Monsanto Saccharin 1901: Monsanto was founded in St. Louis, Missouri by John Francis Queeny, a 30-year veteran of the pharmaceutical industry. Queeny funded the start-up with capital from Coca-Cola (saccharin). Founder John Francis Queeny named Monsanto Chemical Works after his wife, Olga Mendez Monsanto. Queeny's father in law was Emmanuel Mendes de Monsanto, wealthy financier of a sugar company active in Vieques, Puerto Rico and based in St. Thomas in the Danish West Indies.

1902: The company manufactures its first product, the artificial sweetener Saccharin, which Monsanto sold to the Coca-Cola Company. The U.S. government later files suit over the safety of Saccharin - but loses.

1905: John Queeny's company was also producing caffeine and vanillin and was beginning to turn a profit.

Fresca - NO Cyclamate 1919: Monsanto established its presence in Europe by entering into a partnership with Graesser's Chemical Works at Cefn Mawr near Ruabon, Wales to produce vanillin, salicylic acid, aspirin and later rubber.

1967: Searle began the safety tests on aspartame that were necessary for applying for FDA approval of food additives. Dr. Harold Waisman, a biochemist at the University of Wisconsin, conducts aspartame safety tests on infant monkeys on behalf of the Searle Company. Of the 7 monkeys that were being fed aspartame mixed with milk, 1 monkey DIED and 5 other monkeys had grand mal seizures.

1970: Cyclamate (the reigning low-calorie artificial sweetener) is pulled off the market in November after some scientists associate it with cancer. Questions are also raised about safety of saccharin, the only other artificial sweetener on the market, leaving the field wide open for aspartame.

December 18, 1970: Searle Company executives lay out a "Food and Drug Sweetener Strategy" that they feel will put the FDA into a positive frame of mind about aspartame. An internal policy memo describes psychological tactics the company should use to bring the FDA into a subconscious spirit of participation" with them on aspartame and get FDA regulators into the "habit of saying Yes."

1971: Neuroscientist Dr. John Olney (whose pioneering work with monosodium glutamate MSG was responsible for having it removed from baby foods) informs Searle that his studies show that aspartic acid (one of the ingredients of aspartame) caused holes in the brains of infant mice. One of Searle's own researchers confirmed Dr. Olney's findings in a similar study.

1973: After spending tens of millions of dollars conducting safety tests, the G.D. Searle Company applies for FDA approval and submits over 100 studies they claim support aspartame's safety. One of the first FDA scientists to review the aspartame safety data states that "the information provided (by Searle) is inadequate to permit an evaluation of the potential toxicity of aspartame". She says in her report that in order to be certain that aspartame is safe, further clinical tests are needed.

1974: Attorney Jim Turner (consumer advocate who was instrumental in getting cyclamate taken off the market) meets with Searle representatives in May to discuss Dr. Olney's 1971 study which showed that aspartic acid caused holes in the brains of infant mice.

Monsanto Pirates1974: The FDA grants aspartame its first approval for restricted use in dry foods on July 26.

1974: Jim Turner and Dr. John Olney file the first objections against aspartame's approval in August.

1976: Monsanto produces Cycle-Safe, the world's first plastic soft-drink bottle. The bottle, suspected of posing a cancer risk, is banned the following year by the Food and Drug Administration.

1976: Turner & Olney's petition on March 24 triggers an FDA investigation of the laboratory practices of aspartame's manufacturer, G.D. Searle. The investigation finds Searle's testing procedures shoddy, full of inaccuracies and "manipulated" test data. The investigators report they "had never seen anything as bad as Searle's testing."

January 10, 1977: The FDA formally requests the U.S. Attorney's office to begin grand jury proceedings to investigate whether indictments should be filed against Searle for knowingly misrepresenting findings and "concealing material facts and making false statements" in aspartame safety tests. This is the first time in the FDA's history that they request a criminal investigation of a manufacturer.

January 26, 1977: While the grand jury probe is underway, Sidley & Austin, the law firm representing Searle, begins job negotiations with the U.S. Attorney in charge of the investigation, Samuel Skinner.

Donald Rumsfeld, Ford, Bush, and Monsanto Employee
March 8, 1977: G. D. Searle hires prominent Washington insider Donald Rumsfeld as the new CEO to try to turn the beleaguered company around. A former Member of Congress and Secretary of Defense in the Ford Administration, Rumsfeld brings in several of his Washington cronies as top management. Donald Rumsfeld followed Searle as CEO, and then as President of Searle from 1977-1985.

July 1, 1977: Samuel Skinner leaves the U.S. Attorney's office on July 1st and takes a job with Searle's law firm. (see Jan. 26th)

August 1, 1977: The Bressler Report, compiled by FDA investigators and headed by Jerome Bressler, is released. The report finds that 98 of the 196 animals died during one of Searle's studies and weren't autopsied until later dates, in some cases over one year after death. Many other errors and inconsistencies are noted. For example, a rat was reported alive, then dead, then alive, then dead again; a mass, a uterine polyp, and ovarian neoplasms were found in animals but not reported or diagnosed in Searle's reports.

December 8, 1977: U.S. Attorney Skinner's withdrawal and resignation stalls the Searle grand jury investigation for so long that the statue of limitations on the aspartame charges runs out. The grand jury investigation is dropped. (borderline treason)

1979: The FDA established a Public Board of Inquiry (PBOI) in June to rule on safety issues surrounding NutraSweet.

1980: September 30, FDA Board of Inquiry comprised of 3 independent scientists, confirmed that aspartame "might induce brain tumors". The Public Board of Inquiry concludes NutraSweet should not be approved pending further investigations of brain tumors in animals. The board states it "has NOT been presented with proof of reasonable certainty that aspartame is safe for use as a food additive." The FDA had actually banned aspartame based on this finding, only to have Searle Chairman Donald Rumsfeld (Ford's Secretary of Defense 1975-1977, Bush's Secretary of Defense 2001-2006) vow to "call in his markers," to get it approved in 1981.

Rumsfeld and Aspartame

January 1981: Donald Rumsfeld, CEO of Searle, states in a sales meeting that he is going to make a big push to get aspartame approved within the year. Rumsfeld says he will use his political pull in Washington, rather than scientific means, to make sure it gets approved.

May 19, 1981: 3 of 6 in-house FDA scientists who were responsible for reviewing the brain tumor issues, Dr. Robert Condon, Dr. Satya Dubey, and Dr. Douglas Park, advise against approval of NutraSweet, stating on the record that the Searle tests are unreliable and not adequate to determine the safety of aspartame.

Equal aspartame sweetner1981: Ronald Reagan is sworn in as President of the United States. Reagan's transition team, which includes Donald Rumsfeld, CEO of G. D. Searle, hand picks Dr. Arthur Hull Hayes Jr. to be the new FDA Commissioner. On January 21, the day after Ronald Reagan's inauguration, GD Searle re-applied to the FDA for approval to use aspartame in food sweetener, and Reagan's new FDA commissioner, Arthur Hayes Hull, Jr., appointed a 5-person Scientific Commission to review the board of inquiry's decision. It soon became clear that the panel would uphold the ban by a 3-2 decision, but Hull then installed a 6th member on the commission, and the vote became deadlocked. He then personally broke the tie in aspartame's favor. Hull later left the FDA under allegations of impropriety, served briefly as Provost at New York Medical College, and then took a position with Burston-Marsteller, the chief public relations firm for both Monsanto and GD Searle. Since that time Hull has never spoken publicly about aspartame.

July 15, 1981: In one of his first official acts, Dr. Arthur Hayes Jr., the new FDA commissioner, overrules the Public Board of Inquiry, ignores the recommendations of his own internal FDA team and approves NutraSweet for dry products. Hayes says that aspartame has been shown to be safe for its' proposed uses and says few compounds have withstood such detailed testing and repeated close scrutiny. G.D. Searle gets FDA approval for aspartame (NutraSweet). Monsanto completes its acquisition of Searle in 1985.

October 15, 1982: The FDA announces that GD Searle has filed a petition that aspartame be approved as a sweetener in carbonated beverages and other liquids.

July 1, 1983: The National Soft Drink Association (NSDA) urges the FDA to delay approval of aspartame for carbonated beverages pending further testing because aspartame is very unstable in liquid form. When liquid aspartame is stored in temperatures above 85°F degrees Fahrenheit, aspartame breaks down into known toxins Diketopiperazines (DKP), methyl (wood) alcohol, and formaldehyde.

July 8, 1983: The National Soft Drink Association drafts an objection to the final ruling which permits the use of aspartame in carbonated beverages and syrup bases and requests a hearing on the objections. The association says that Searle has not provided responsible certainty that aspartame and its' degradation products are safe for use in soft drinks.

August 8, 1983: Consumer Attorney, Jim Turner of the Community Nutrition Institute and Dr. Woodrow Monte, Arizona State University's Director of Food Science and Nutritional Laboratories, file suit with the FDA objecting to aspartame approval based on unresolved safety issues.

September, 1983: FDA Commissioner Hayes resigns under a cloud of controversy about his taking unauthorized rides aboard a General Foods jet. (General foods is a major customer of NutraSweet) Burson-Marsteller, Searle's public relation firm (which also represented several of NutraSweet's major users), immediately hires Hayes as senior scientific consultant.

Fall 1983: The first carbonated beverages containing aspartame are sold for public consumption.

Aspartame Pop

1983: Diet Coke was sweetened with aspartame after the sweetener became available in the United States.

November 1984: Center for Disease Control (CDC) "Evaluation of consumer complaints related to aspartame use." (summary by B. Mullarkey)

The NutraSweet Company1985: Monsanto purchased G.D. Searle, the chemical company that held the patent to aspartame, the active ingredient in NutraSweet. Monsanto was apparently untroubled by aspartame's clouded past, including a 1980 FDA Board of Inquiry, comprised of three independent scientists, which confirmed that it "might induce brain tumors". The aspartame business became a separate Monsanto subsidiary, the NutraSweet Company.

1986: Monsanto found guilty of negligently exposing a worker to benzene at its Chocolate Bayou Plant in Texas. It is forced to pay $100 million to the family of Wilbur Jack Skeen, a worker who died of leukemia after repeated exposures.

1986: At a congressional hearing, medical specialists denounce a National Cancer Institute study disputing that formaldehyde causes cancer. Monsanto and DuPont scientists helped with the study, whose author provided results to the Formaldehyde Institute industry representatives nearly six months before releasing the study to the EPA, labor unions, and the public.

November 3, 1987: U.S. hearing, "NutraSweet: Health and Safety Concerns," Committee on Labor and Human Resources, Senator Howard Metzenbaum, chairman.

1988: A federal jury finds Monsanto Co.'s subsidiary, G.D. Searle & Co., negligent in testing and marketing of its Copper 7 intrauterine birth control device (IUD). The verdict followed the unsealing of internal documents regarding safety concerns about the IUD, which was used by nearly 10 million women between 1974 and 1986.

1998: "Survey of aspartame studies: correlation of outcome and funding sources," unpublished: Ralph G. Walton found 166 separate published studies in the peer reviewed medical literature, which had relevance for questions of human safety. The 74 studies funded by industry all (100%) attested to aspartame's safety, whereas of the 92 non-industry funded studies, 84 (91%) identified a problem. 6 of the 7 non-industry funded studies that were favorable to aspartame safety were from the FDA, which has a public record that shows a strong pro-industry bias.

1999: Monsanto sells their phenylalanine facilities to Great Lakes Chemical Corporation (GLC) for $125 million. In 2000, GLC sued Monsanto because of a $71 million dollar shortfall in expected sales.

How Aspartame Became Legal - The Timeline

Aspartame Kids
Poisoned by Monsanto GMO Food

please ask if you want more resources...

 

 

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